not just the pink ball kirby...

Kirby Araullo is a UC Davis student (of History, War & Peace Studies, and, Asian American Studies), a guerrilla filmmaker, the basis of the KD measurement, sometimes a turtle, sometimes a dolphin, sometimes a monkey, but, popularly known as the pink ball from Nintendo that devours almost anything and everything he wants. As a Guerrilla filmmaker his works have appeared and received critical acclaim in student and independent film festivals both in California and in the Philippines. As a proud Filipino of Kapampangan descent, he loves to experiment in the kitchen with whatever ingredients he can find then post the picture of the final product on his social networking accounts so look for him on twitter, instagram, lookbook, tumblr, etc.
Recent Tweets @karaullo

We turned this small hamster cage into a space for #YuriAndKoko’s Hay but I guess Yuri also found her new throne or maybe she’d like to be Rapunzel too lol
#guineapigs #guineapigsof_ig #cavy #thetwinpiglets @thetwinpiglets (at quéti quécami)

When boredom strikes at midnight… make some #ThaiTea #Pastillas :P
#SoutheastAsian #desserts #fusion *wink*
#thai #kapampangan #filipino #milkcandy #newflavor #teehee (at quéti quécami)

(via hoybata)

nclrmrz:

For hun­dreds of years, the Lumad indige­nous peo­ples of Min­danao, like many indige­nous com­mu­ni­ties in the Philip­pines and through­out the world have con­tin­u­ally been pushed from their ances­tral land.

In Sarangani, the B’laan have been pushed to the moun­tain tops, where they receive lit­tle to no access to basic ser­vices and edu­ca­tion from their gov­ern­ment. Chil­dren walk up to three hours, through dense and tough ter­rain, through moun­tains and rivers to reach their school. It is through com­mu­nity orga­niz­ing and col­lec­tive strug­gle that peo­ple are able to pro­vide edu­ca­tion and food and sup­plies to areas where the gov­ern­ment refuses to develop roads or any means of bet­ter­ing peo­ples’ lives. 

Fac­ing heavy dis­crim­i­na­tion from out­side com­mu­ni­ties and the mil­i­tary, the B’laan grad­u­ally ceased wear­ing their tra­di­tional cloth­ing, sav­ing it for spe­cial occa­sions. Now, their lives, cul­ture, and way of liv­ing are fur­ther being threat­ened by mil­i­tary enforced for­eign min­ing oper­a­tions that will ren­der their land use­less for farm­ing and living. (via nclrmrz » Blog Archive » B’laan)

(via fyfilipinopride)

pag-asaharibon:

Filipino music is idiosyncratic inside Asia by its deep Hispanization and Western features. However, pre-Hispanic indigenous music remains manifest in oral traditions connecting it with Southeast Asian personality. Muslims in the Philippines (Moros) preserve this realm, being the Kulintang the most notorious instrument. After a contemporary process to recover the indigenous traditions as part of the Philippine Civilization, a historiography dealing with different aspect of the Kulintang has been developed. The standard kulintang nowadays is composed by eight gongs, from biggest to smaller, from lowest to highest. These gongs are disposed in a row over a wooden construction, suspended on strings as braces. Each gong has a protuberance (“boss”), in which the performer plays with a pair of sticks made of soft wood.

(via fyfilipinopride)

pag-asaharibon:

A bachelor society of immigrant workers, Filipino men constituted 94% of the Filipino population in the U.S. mainland in the 1930s. As Asian American Studies scholar Linda Espana-Maram describes, Filipinos were laborers in “some of the most exploitative sectors.” They worked back-breaking jobs such as working in lettuce fields for eight to ten hours a day with an hourly wage of 15 cents. Though they came to the U.S. as American nationals, Filipinos were not treated as such. Before even setting foot on U.S. soil, Filipinos sung patriotic American songs, were fluent in English, and idolized famous Hollywood stars, but they were racially discriminated against and seen as, “working-class brown hordes.” For Filipino immigrant workers in the 1930s, a life apart from the oppressive laborious jobs was an endeavor they actively sought. They found a life of excitement and culture in the taxi dance halls. At taxi dance halls, Filipinos “developed a dynamic subculture” where they “paid to dance with women in timed, ritualized sequences.” Here Filipino men made rare social contact with women who were largely white, occasionally Mexican, and very rarely Filipina. Filipinos resisted images of dirty, poor laborers and transformed into suave, charming men who devoutly sported the McIntosh suit. Through the images of the man in the McIntosh suit, who was suave and danced well, Filipino men formed a vibrant masculine identity that not only caught the attention of white women but evoked a strong resentment amongst white men.

(via fyfilipinopride)

pag-asaharibon:

wessle:

“Filipino men, 1920s.” Photo courtesy “Seattle’s International District: The Making of a Pan-Asian American Community”

steelo.

Some background on this photo from Fil-Am Experiences 1930-1945 entry entitled Filipino immigrant workers: Reinvented in McIntosh Suits:

The image of the charismatic Filipino immigrant dressed in his expensive McIntosh suit is a typical image associated to Filipino men of the taxi dance halls in the 1930s. The McIntosh suit is “expensive formal attire with padded shoulders and wide lapels worn by some of Hollywood’s most famous men like William Powell.” The Filipinos’ strong desire for a “form-fitted” McIntosh influenced companies like the Calderon Co. to advertise their shops with displays promoting, “custom-built Hollywood clothes.” It is important to note the Filipinos’ adamant desire to purchase the McIntosh suit. Filipino men in the 1930s wouldn’t sport any other suit than the McIntosh suit. “Frank Coloma recalled that whenever he went out, ‘I [he] always wore the very best suit- McIntosh suit.’” As Linda Espana-Maram points out, “Filipino laborers subverted icons of white-middle class American masucilinity” as Filipino identities of “asexual laborers in the dirty, tattered overalls,” transformed through their chic dress. The Filipino escapes invisibility as just another migrant laborer through distinct dress, but becomes more vulnerable to the reception of white America.

(via fyfilipinopride)

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Heavy rain dampens the protests near the highway and at the police station in Ferguson.

Part 6.

(via hoybata)

tefpoe1:

The national mobilization begins …. We are asking people all over the world to join us in #Ferguson and help us flood the city with the war cry for #justice4mikebrown and the countless other victims of police brutality … People from all over the world will be joining us !!!

(via jessehimself)

jessehimself:

thefitrasta:

Justin Lynch beating Michael Phelps record at just 16

It’s always lovely to be around #MOSfam! ♡♡♡ #ssi2012 #seshone #seshjuan #szechuan :,) (at Downtown Davis)

It’s always lovely to be around #MOSfam! ♡♡♡ #ssi2012 #seshone #seshjuan #szechuan :,) (at Downtown Davis)

But why you gotta wear my outfit doe? Lol #TeamYaK #coincidence #SEAUS #RiseUpAtUCD #wellnesswednesday #ucdavis #hickeypool #lapswimming (at Hickey Pool—UC Davis)